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Report | Final conference for the research network IsoNose

Prof. Friedhelm von Blanckenburg (2. f.l.) at the IsoNose final conference (photo: D. A. Frick, GFZ).
Participants of the IsoNose final conference (photo: D. A. Frick, GFZ).
Poster presentation at the IsoNose final conference (photo: D. A. Frick, GFZ).

The European Initial Training Network (ITN) IsoNose held its final conference from 8 to 11 January in Sorèze, France. In February 2018 funding of the project, coordinated at the GFZ in section Earth Surface Geochemistry, ends.

„IsoNose“stands for Isotopic Tools as Novel Sensors of Earth Surface Resources. It was the first ITN coordinated at the GFZ. ITNs are training programs for early career scientists funded by the EU. Since 2014 twelve PhD students and two Postdocs worked together with several project partners in the novel research field of metal isotope geochemistry. A focus was on the development of innovative applications and methods.

For one last time the workshop, held in the Midi-Pyrénées region, gathered all participants as well as experts to discuss state of the art of metal isotope geochemistry research and the main results of the past years. During this time, isotope “fingerprints” were used to characterize natural processes, to improve the detection and exploration of metal ore deposits. Furthermore, analytical methods were advanced.

Friedhelm von Blanckenburg, ITN coordinator: “We are very pleased with the course of the project and the successful final conference. It surely opened future career avenues for our PhD-Fellows”. (ak)

>>More information on IsoNose

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