Section 2.5: Geodynamic Modeling

Projects

Many fundamental evolutionary cycles on Earth - including the dispersal of supercontinents and the global carbon cycle - are driven by our planet's dynamic engine, plate tectonics. Geodynamic processes hold important implications for climate science since CO2 is released from Earth’s interior into the atmosphere. In order to link plate tectonics and complex lithospheric deformation to the global carbon cycle we combine plate tectonic reconstruction with numerical carbon cycle simulation. This allows quantifying the tectonic evolution of plate boundaries as well as tectonic CO2 release rates through deep time with profound implications for long-term climate simulations.

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Rifts provide a unique window into the geodynamic system of our planet and the processes that shape the surface of the Earth. This project aims at a thorough understanding of continental rift dynamics and rifted margin formation by means of a comprehensive multi-scale numerical modelling design.

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RHUM-RUM (Réunion Hotspot and Upper Mantle - Réunions Unterer Mantel) is a French-German passive seismic experiment designed to image a classical oceanic mantle plume – or lack of plume – from crust to core beneath Réunion Island. The results enable insights into the material and heat flow in the Earth's deep interior and provide a geodynamic context for the still controversially debated deep mantle plumes.

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Since the Great Sumatra 2004 Boxing Day earthquake and tsunami GFZ provides research and methodologic development in the fields of tsunami hazard assessment and early warning. Section 2.5 Geodynamic Modeling supports these activities with numerical modeling of tsunami generation, propagation and coastal impact within both deterministic and probabilistic frameworks. Our Section also participates in the development of the innovative GNSS-based technology for tsunami early warning.

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